Who is this beauty?

By the same artist who did the Sophia Loren painting several posts ago,

I find this to be a very alluring painting.

Perhaps it’s an image from an Italian film?

Or, is it just made up?

Anyway, I was and still am, drawn in.

Gotta get that reflection in the car. Why else do cars park in front of art?

Sorry, could stop shooting this. I didn’t want to leave.

Pics taken by Resa – December 1, 2021

Toronto, Canada

The Artist:

79 thoughts on “Who is this beauty?

    1. I’m okay with the spider, because it’s only a painting.
      Although, that old B-movie about the giant spiders I saw, when I was a kid, still keeps me up at night!

  1. You weren’t kidding when you said you had a sexy post coming up. Wow! And yes, alluring is the perfect description of this one. The colors pop and the image nestles into you seductively and then it’s snap crackle pop as you can’t stop taking pics.

    Lucky us.

    1. I adore this painting.
      Yes, I got addicted to taking pics of this.
      My sister had black hair to the ground. Longer than Crystal Gayles.
      Long hair hypnotizes me.
      Beautiful women (and that is not merely physical) have always enticed me.
      The AGM’s are AGM’s because of their beauty.
      So, what about men?
      Well, I have a lot of street art with men, mostly their heads, in my archives.
      Guess I’ll post the one with the pigeons…..soon.

      Lucky us.
      xo

  2. It seems to be an allegory of Italy, that was my first thought at first sight – full of beauty, temper, spirit and a wonderful waving Italian flag. And that black spider – hm… Maybe it represents the Italian ability of building networks. 😉
    Enjoy the weekend, and stay safe, dear Resa!

    1. Apparently the painting is about the Tarentella, an ancient dance from Italy.

      Britannica: The tarantella’s origin is connected with tarantism, a disease or form of hysteria that appeared in Italy in the 15th to the 17th century and that was obscurely associated with the bite of the tarantula spider; victims seemingly were cured by frenzied dancing. All three words ultimately derive from the name of the town of Taranto, Italy. Tarantellas were written for the piano by Frédéric Chopin, Franz Liszt, and Carl Maria von Weber.” So let’s keep dancing.

  3. A fantastic and evocative image that could only be improved on by that car being an Italian brand such as an Alfa Romeo or a Ferrari….not an Acura! Oh and talking of Ferrari…that dress is definitely Rosso Corsa! Red hot! Thanks for sharing again.

    1. Thank you, John. It seems this is a dance called the tarentella!

      Britannica: The tarantella’s origin is connected with tarantism, a disease or form of hysteria that appeared in Italy in the 15th to the 17th century and that was obscurely associated with the bite of the tarantula spider; victims seemingly were cured by frenzied dancing. All three words ultimately derive from the name of the town of Taranto, Italy. Tarantellas were written for the piano by Frédéric Chopin, Franz Liszt, and Carl Maria von Weber.”

    1. It’s a dance, the tarantella!
      Britannica: “The tarantella’s origin is connected with tarantism, a disease or form of hysteria that appeared in Italy in the 15th to the 17th century and that was obscurely associated with the bite of the tarantula spider; victims seemingly were cured by frenzied dancing. All three words ultimately derive from the name of the town of Taranto, Italy. Tarantellas were written for the piano by Frédéric Chopin, Franz Liszt, and Carl Maria von Weber.”

    1. Thank you, Dave! I do my best with this glorious ephemeral art form.
      SO, Rebecca found this:
      Britannica: The tarantella’s origin is connected with tarantism, a disease or form of hysteria that appeared in Italy in the 15th to the 17th century and that was obscurely associated with the bite of the tarantula spider; victims seemingly were cured by frenzied dancing. All three words ultimately derive from the name of the town of Taranto, Italy. Tarantellas were written for the piano by Frédéric Chopin, Franz Liszt, and Carl Maria von Weber.”

      Merril offered: https://www.upi.com/Archives/1982/05/20/Crowds-danced-and-sereneded-jailed-movie-siren-Sophia-Loren/3472390715200/

      Street art is more than it is credited with!

    1. JT!
      Check this out:
      Britannica: The tarantella’s origin is connected with tarantism, a disease or form of hysteria that appeared in Italy in the 15th to the 17th century and that was obscurely associated with the bite of the tarantula spider; victims seemingly were cured by frenzied dancing. All three words ultimately derive from the name of the town of Taranto, Italy. Tarantellas were written for the piano by Frédéric Chopin, Franz Liszt, and Carl Maria von Weber.”

      Also:

      https://www.upi.com/Archives/1982/05/20/Crowds-danced-and-sereneded-jailed-movie-siren-Sophia-Loren/3472390715200/

    1. Thunder!
      Rebecca says it’s a dance, the tarantella dance from Italy.
      Britannica: The tarantella’s origin is connected with tarantism, a disease or form of hysteria that appeared in Italy in the 15th to the 17th century and that was obscurely associated with the bite of the tarantula spider; victims seemingly were cured by frenzied dancing. All three words ultimately derive from the name of the town of Taranto, Italy. Tarantellas were written for the piano by Frédéric Chopin, Franz Liszt, and Carl Maria von Weber.”

  4. I feel like dancing! Resa – this artist is also a brilliant historian. This is the tarantella dance from Italy. I remember it from my early music lessons. I was 7 years old and I was starting to play with two hands. I especially like the “tarantella” song, but didn’t know why there was a spider! I was told that the dancers were trying to get away from the spider and the bite. Here is the expiation given by Britannica: The tarantella’s origin is connected with tarantism, a disease or form of hysteria that appeared in Italy in the 15th to the 17th century and that was obscurely associated with the bite of the tarantula spider; victims seemingly were cured by frenzied dancing. All three words ultimately derive from the name of the town of Taranto, Italy. Tarantellas were written for the piano by Frédéric Chopin, Franz Liszt, and Carl Maria von Weber.” So let’s keep dancing. Thank you for this showcasing this amazing mural and artist!

      1. This is BRILLIANT! Thank you Resa and Merril. I did not know that Sophia Loren was in jail. I love that she had milk and cookies for breakfast and that flowers were pouring in from all over Italy and the world. I LOVE this forays back into history. So many great stories!! Thank you!!! Sending hugs!

    1. Becky,
      Turns out it’s a dance!
      The Tarentella
      Britannica: The tarantella’s origin is connected with tarantism, a disease or form of hysteria that appeared in Italy in the 15th to the 17th century and that was obscurely associated with the bite of the tarantula spider; victims seemingly were cured by frenzied dancing. All three words ultimately derive from the name of the town of Taranto, Italy. Tarantellas were written for the piano by Frédéric Chopin, Franz Liszt, and Carl Maria von Weber.”

  5. This is so captivating, the flow of the gorgeous red dress , dancing the Tarantella ( per Rebecca)
    She so exotic and enchanting. She’s dangerous too, the spider is a sure sign . Just lovely dear Resa. It seems your wall art gets more and more stunning!

    1. Just took a break from drawing. It’s a learning night!
      Different leads in pencils, smudging, blending and patterning.
      This Zombie is helping make me a better artist!

      I’m thrilled Rebecca recognized the Tarantella.
      It makes the mural all the more interesting and captivating!
      Well, I can’t help it. I post the best first. Still there is lots of sweet art in my archives!
      xoxoxoxo

    1. Haha! Didn’t see that until you pointed it out!
      One other person made the same observation.
      She’s dancing the Tarantella!
      ✨🙏🕉💃🏽🕷✨🙏🕉💃🏽🕷✨🙏🕉💃🏽🕷

    1. It truly is beautiful art, Michel!
      Turns out the bullfight is a dance, The Tarentella. xoxo ❤

      Britannica: The tarantella’s origin is connected with tarantism, a disease or form of hysteria that appeared in Italy in the 15th to the 17th century and that was obscurely associated with the bite of the tarantula spider; victims seemingly were cured by frenzied dancing. All three words ultimately derive from the name of the town of Taranto, Italy. Tarantellas were written for the piano by Frédéric Chopin, Franz Liszt, and Carl Maria von Weber.”

  6. Hmm…. I don’t recognize this one. May be Monica Bellucci… but don’t know. What I do know is it’s a brilliant mural! It’s the spider that baffled me! I love the reflections… of course!
    xoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxo


    1. Apparently it's a dance, the Tarantella.
      From Rebecca Budd –
      Britannica: The tarantella’s origin is connected with tarantism, a disease or form of hysteria that appeared in Italy in the 15th to the 17th century and that was obscurely associated with the bite of the tarantula spider; victims seemingly were cured by frenzied dancing. All three words ultimately derive from the name of the town of Taranto, Italy. Tarantellas were written for the piano by Frédéric Chopin, Franz Liszt, and Carl Maria von Weber.”
      xoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxoxo

  7. Resa, this is an alluring wall mural. I have gone back and forth between a “Westside Story” vibe with Rita Moreno in my head, to an Italian immigrant to the city given the three vivid colors, who is doing a dance of celebration. Thanks for sharing. Keith

    1. It does in fact have meaning!
      From blogger Rebecca Budd –
      Britannica: The tarantella’s origin is connected with tarantism, a disease or form of hysteria that appeared in Italy in the 15th to the 17th century and that was obscurely associated with the bite of the tarantula spider; victims seemingly were cured by frenzied dancing. All three words ultimately derive from the name of the town of Taranto, Italy. Tarantellas were written for the piano by Frédéric Chopin, Franz Liszt, and Carl Maria von Weber.”

    1. Roberta!
      The spider in this wonderful painting is important.
      Rebecca Budd relayed this:

      Britannica: The tarantella’s origin is connected with tarantism, a disease or form of hysteria that appeared in Italy in the 15th to the 17th century and that was obscurely associated with the bite of the tarantula spider; victims seemingly were cured by frenzied dancing. All three words ultimately derive from the name of the town of Taranto, Italy. Tarantellas were written for the piano by Frédéric Chopin, Franz Liszt, and Carl Maria von Weber.”

  8. Stunning, Resa, Thank you for sharing. Maybe it’s your first few photos, but it seems like there’s a trompe l’oeil effect. I wondered about the spider, too, until I saw in comments above that she’s dancing a tarantella. So the artist knows something about music and history, as well as Sophia Loren).
    Look what I found. Sophia Loren was in jail for tax evasion in 1982, and crowds danced the tarantella and threw flowers to her cell.
    https://www.upi.com/Archives/1982/05/20/Crowds-danced-and-sereneded-jailed-movie-siren-Sophia-Loren/3472390715200/

    1. Janet!
      You are 1 of 2 who see the cloaked figure.
      I see it now, but it had to be pointed out!
      True, there is a lot of motion in this painting. That is one of the main reasons I was drawn to it!
      Cheers!

  9. Have you sang any of the songs from Carmen?
    I’d LOVE to hear you sing Carmen!
    I’m answering from being logged into Art Gowns. I know you know who I am, so won’t be confused!
    Now, to answer your comment on Art Gowns!!

Speak your art mind!

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.