Burn The Bra

 Hope you will take a moment to read my guest post on “When Women Inspire”. Hey, that’s my bra you see burning!

Today I welcome Resa McConaghy with a guest post on the history of “burn the bra.” Is it a feminist legend? Or a feminist myth instead? In her well-written post, Resa includes discussions of Gloria Steinem’s A Bunny’s Tale, the 1968 Miss America Pageant, the Freedom Trash Can, and more. Oh and that burning bra in the photo above? Resa set it afire to mark the end to her research. Take it away, Resa.

VIA: https://whenwomeninspire.com/2019/04/09/burn-the-bra-feminist-legend-myth/

Comments are closed. Please comment on Christy’s blog!

A Women’s Parliament

On January 28, 1914, Nellie McClung starred as Manitoba’s suspender snapping and cigar smoking Premier, in a mock parliament at the Walker Theater in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Artist: Mandy van Leeuwen
Artist: Mandy van Leeuwen

This is Post two of “Nellie week” presented by Christy Birmingham of When Women Inspire & I.

The previous day, January 27, 1914, Nellie and many women of the Political Equality League met with Premier Roblin and the legislative body to request the vote for women.

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Artist: Mandy van Lueewen

Premier Roblin condescended. He said, “I believe woman suffrage would break up the home and send women to mix up in political meetings.”

Artist: Mandy van Lueewen
Artist: Mandy van Lueewen

This prompted a guerilla “mock parliament” wherein women had the vote, but not men. It was added to that night’s showing of  How They Won The Vote“, a play originally produced in London. It was adapted to fit Winnipeg in 1914.

Artist: Mandy van Lueewen
Artist: Mandy van Lueewen

Vis-a-vis  this amazing mural in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Christy and I take a look at the mock parliament that changed women’s voting rights of yesterday into women’s voting rights of today, in Canada.

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Artist: Mandy van Leeuwen

It featured: Nellie as  a female Premier Roblin, and her daughter Florence,  as a parliamentary page. As well, it showcased 2 other mother and daughter pairs.

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Artist: Mandy van Leeuwen

There was Harriet Walker (Minister of Public Works) and her daughter Ruth (a parliamentary page). I am not sure which image is Mrs. Walker.  Mrs. Francis Graham, below,  portrayed Speaker of the House. Her daughter, Miss Alma Graham, was a Clerk.

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Artist: Mandy van Leeuwen

The following text does not necessarily reflect the ensuing photographs. Dr. Mary Crawford played the Minister of Health and Education…

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Artist: Mandy van Leeuwen

… Miss Kenneth Haig { Attorney General), Mrs. Lipsett-Skinner (Minister of Agriculture), Miss Francis Beynon (Leader of the Opposition) and Dorothy Milne.

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Artist: Mandy van Leeuwen

Mrs. Lipsett-Skinner, pleasantly satirical, rejected a bill introducing labor-saving devices. The thought was, if men had spare time on their hands, they could start educating themselves. Next thing, they’d be petitioning for the vote.

 
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Artist: Mandy van Leeuwen

Many men were in support of the Suffrage movement, and took part in the play. A delegation of men, headed by R.C. Skinner, came seeking suffrage privileges for the male sex. They had a slogan “We have the brains. Why not let us vote?”

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Artist: Mandy van Leeuwen
 
The men’s case was ardently presented. The bill was effectively thwarted by Premier McClung, in the same vein (but with comedic overtone) that she and the Women’s Equality League had been dissed the day before.
The audience howled in delight.
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Artist: Mandy van Leeuwen

To read the transcripts of the awesome “Winnipeg Free Press” review of that hilarious and historic night’s play about a mock parliament published on January 29, 1914 go to:

The Nellie McClung Foundation – Primary Sources Page – “Women Score in Drama and Debate” (4th article down) Apologies for the indirect link.

Artist: Mandy van Leeuwen
Artist: Mandy van Leeuwen

In the CBC archives from 1974 , is a video narrated by Beatrice Brighton who as a young girl  attended “A Woman’s Pariament” with  her mother. This is definitely worth a watch!

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Artist: Mandy van Leeuwen
Although Nellie and her family had moved to Edmonton, she returned to Manitoba to campaign for Liberal leader T. C. Norris in the August 1915 election. He defeated Premier Roblin. On January 28, 1916 Norris delivered his promise, granting full suffrage to the women of Manitoba.

 The third and final installment of “Nellie Week” will be posted on When Women Inspire in 2 days, on December 16.

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Artist: Mandy van Leeuwen – Photo & adjustment by Resa

 Pics taken by Resa – October 30 , 2016

Winnipeg, Manitoba
 

The Artist: Mandy van Leeuwen

⭐ Special thanks to: Jen Mosienko, Sari Habiluk & Sharon Jonson ⭐

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The Nellie McClung Foundation supports and celebrates equal rights for all human  beings, regardless of sex, race or creed.

Artist: Mandy van Leeuwen
Artist: Mandy van Leeuwen

This mural at 560 Sargent Avenue is to celebrate 100 years of women voting in Manitoba

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It is sponsored by: Crestview Pharmacy, Cindy Gilroy, Province of Manitoba/Sports, Culture & Heritage, Winnipeg Building and Decorating, University of Winnipeg,  North American Lumber, West End BIZ, Nellie McLung Foundation, Take Pride Winnipeg, and Winnipeg Foundation

My Funny Afterthoughts

Women had bigger and better hats than men. No wonder men were threatened. (Wink!)

Artist: Mandy van Leeuwen
Artist: Mandy van Leeuwen

So many issues! It’s a wonder men ever got the vote! (Wink!)

Artist: Mandy van Leeuwen
Artist: Mandy van Leeuwen

100 years later, women still do not have pay equity to men, in Canada! (No wink)

Artist: Mandy van Leeuwen
Artist: Mandy van Leeuwen

Lastly, if you love poetry and stories visit Christy on her other blog Poetic Parfait

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Artist: Mandy van Leeuwen

Sunnyside Beach Amusement Park – 1922 – 1954

This was a very famous place in it’s day.

Artist: Walter Rushton
Artist: Walter Rushton

In 1923 they had the “Water Nymph’s” Contest. It was advertised in the papers and more men than women showed up.

Artist: Walter Rushton
Artist: Walter Rushton

The Bathing Pavillion you see below is still in existence, although now a fun restaurant on the beach.


SSB #3

Between the Pavillion and Toronto’s now renovated “Palais Royale”, where Count Basie, Duke Ellington and many greats played (Even the Stones played there much later)….

 

Artist: Walter Rushton
Artist: Walter Rushton

…. was a boardwalk & the most modern midway with rides, games and food. The Roller Coaster was the biggest in the world, and made of wood.

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The next 2 shots attempt to show the entire mural, but don’t. It’s longer than I could capture.

Artist: Walter Rushton
Artist: Walter Rushton

It’s painted in an Impressionistic style on stucco, which makes for more photography woes. Also it’s at least 12 years faded.

Artist: Walter Rushton
Artist: Walter Rushton

The Beach Park is painted in the center of 3 strips. Above you have an early air show. Below is a painted garden.

Artist: Walter Rushton
Artist: Walter Rushton

 

It’s bordered by a parkette, and the summer they fill it with  the same flowers that the artist painted on the mural.

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Many historical writings say  the beloved Toronto Amusement Park was burned down, an act of arson to make way for the Gardner Expressway. I’d love to back in time and spend a day here!

Artist: Walter Rushton
Artist: Walter Rushton

Pics taken by Resa, on October 15, 2012 & March 16, 2014

Toronto, Canada

Fishing In Mimico Creek

This 1920’s historical mural is in Islington Village.

Artist: John Kuna
Artist: John Kuna

It depicts children fishing in Mimico Creek and the underwater wildlife that existed in the creek at that time.

I couldn’t get up onto that private balcony. (rats)

Artist: John Kuna
Artist: John Kuna

It was painted in 2012.

Artist: John Kuna
Artist: John Kuna
Artist: John Kuna
Artist: John Kuna

Find it at 5096 Dundas St. West.

Artist: John Kuna
Artist: John Kuna
Artist: John Kuna
Artist: John Kuna
Artist: John Kuna
Artist: John Kuna

Pics taken by Resa: April 28, 2013

Toronto, Canada

The Olde Streetcar

In Islington Village Toronto

Artist: John Kuna
Artist: John Kuna

Here is the rest of one of the historical murals by artist, John Kuna that make Toronto beautiful. I had been so excited when I found it, that I came home and hastily posted just one pic in the oxymornically titled post Vintage Youth

Artist: John Kuna
Artist: John Kuna
Artist: John Kuna
Artist: John Kuna
Artist: John Kuna
Artist: John Kuna
Artist: John Kuna
Artist: John Kuna
Artist: John Kuna
Artist: John Kuna
Artist: John Kuna
Artist: John Kuna

Pics taken by Resa, on April 28, 2013

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

1817 & 1877

Winnipeg – 1817 & 1877

The 2 historical murals in this post are the last 2 of 5 in this historical series by Jill Sellers.

Artist: Jill Sellers
Artist: Jill Sellers

Lord Selkirk signs a treaty with Chief Peguis that cedes part of The Red & Assiniboine river valleys.

Artist: Jill Seffers
Artist: Jill Seffers

I wish I had better pics, but the relentlessly blinding prairie sun was out in full force.

Artist: Jill Seffers
Artist: Jill Seffers

These murals are at 1812 Main Street.

Artist: Jill Sellers
Artist: Jill Sellers
Artist: Jill Sellers
Artist: Jill Sellers
Artist: Jill Sellers
Artist: Jill Sellers

In 1877 Western Canada’s first locomotive, The Countess of Dufferin, arrives by barge in Winnipeg.

Artist: Jill Sellers
Artist: Jill Sellers
Artist: Jill Sellers
Artist: Jill Sellers
Artist: Jill Sellers
Artist: Jill Sellers

mmm

Artist: Jill Sellers
Artist: Jill Sellers

The sun just bleached everything.

Artist: Jill Sellers
Artist: Jill Sellers

Other Posts (with better pics) from these beautiful murals

Canadian Pride

Cree Woman

A Cree Encampment

Scene – 1816

Cuthbert Grant – 1816

The Battle of Seven Oaks

Shots taken by Resa, on October 06, 2012

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

The Murals of Winnipeg

Bogota Street Art by Jacqueline Hadel

This is the first book I’ve ever bought about “Street Art” and I just love it!

Bogota Street Art

I bought my copy on Amazon.com

Bogota #1

It’s by Jaqueline Hadel and her site TOKIDOKI is a “Street Art” lovers paradise.

Of course I’ve been through my book 15 (maybe more) times already.

It’s a little documentary gem. How different the social and political climate is in Bogota from Toronto. Yes, we do have some gritty graffiti art in Toronto. However, by comparison to the Street Art in Bogota, the Street Art here is very tame, candy at times.

Even the colourful influence of Native Art never pushes the Graffiti Art of Bogota into the bourgeois.

I took some very enjoyable time out to peruse Jacqueline’s prolific collection of Bogota Street Art on TOKIDOKI.  I wanted to pick out a few fav pics that weren’t in the book.

@ Jacqueline Hadel
@ Jacqueline Hadel
@ Jacqueline Hadel
@ Jacqueline Hadel
@ Jacqueline Hadel
@ Jacqueline Hadel

If you want to know what the author has chosen, you’ll have to buy “Bogota Street Art”.

@ Jacqueline Hadel
@ Jacqueline Hadel
@ Jacqueline Hadel
@ Jacqueline Hadel

All pics in the book are  on her site.

This is the author’s first book, and serves as a trial run for future publi-cations.

Hopefully there will be a second book, and according to Jacqueline, if so, the next book will be all unpublished pics!

In her acknowledgements there is a line:

“…I couldn’t (and after long, didn’t want to) walk down a street that wasn’t decorated in some way by graffiti.”

I know exactly how Jacqueline feels.

Hadel #8

I was so excited when my copy of “Bogota Street Art” arrived that I took it for a walk.

Hadel #9

Congratulations, Jacqueline! Your book is forty pages of beautifully shot intrigue!

Hadel #11